Change: Creative Review’s August/September issue

The latest print issue of CR is all about Change: changes to your industry, to education, working culture, where you work, how you work and the power of creativity to change the world for the better

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Given the nature of the industry, you’d think that creative people would thrive on change. Surely change is what we are all about? Change gives us opportunities, the chance to make the world work better.

But when it comes to our own ways of working, the people we employ, the places we work and the work that we do, creative people can be find change just as big a challenge as more traditionally conservative industries.

We’ve devoted the majority of our August/September issue to this thorny subject. We’ve asked readers to tell us what changes they’d most like to see and we’ve spoken to a range of individuals trying to change the creative industries for the better – whether that’s via improving diversity, culture, education or access. And we’ve also looked at how creative people can enact change – in communities and around issues as important as climate change and ocean plastic.

CHANGING AN INDUSTRY
What changes would you like to see? We asked an array of leading ad industry figures to tell us which one thing they would change about advertising today. We also speak to Casey Bird about what prompted her to set up The Freelance Circle and its attempts to win a fairer deal for creative freelancers.

Naresh Ramchandani issues a challenge to the advertising industry to apply the same restrictions it has imposed on tobacco advertising to products that are harmful to the planet and we talk to Gal-Dem’s Liv Little about driving diversity in the media and to Sir John Sorrell about his life’s work in improving access to the design industry for all.

CHANGING YOURSELF
Have you ever wanted to just up sticks and move to the other side of the world? Designer and art director Leta Sobierajski has done just that, leaving New York for a new life in Tokyo. We talk to her about the challenges and opportunities of making the change.

Closer to home, we talk to Neal Whittington about leaving a job in design to set up his covetable stationery outlet Present & Correct.

And in a more fundamental change, Anna Bergfors tells us about her life and work following gender transition.

CHANGING THE WORLD
We speak to Marice Cumber, founder of charity Accumulate, about how it uses photography to change the lives of some of London’s homeless.

And Sophie Thomas of Thomas.Matthews examines the issues around our use of plastic and proposes a framework for how design can make change happen now, tomorrow and in the future.

While OH OK tell us about their work in engaging communities in Manchester who are affected by urban regeneration.

AND THAT’S NOT ALL
Our new issue also features an interview with designer Yinka Ilori, Gem Fletcher’s review of Rencontres d’Arles, Paul Pensom on finding the right studio space, Richard Banfield on distributed design teams and Hannah Ellis on the inherent bias of algorithms, plus Daniel Benneworth-Gray muses on the potentially paralysing effects of indecision.

PLUS FOR CREATIVE LEADERS
In our new War Stories series, Chris Bovill and John Allison recall a particularly challenging job from their time at Channel 4. Anna Higgs’ latest advice column helps a reader who wants to change career after 20 years. Tanya Livesey examines the  challenges of making change for creative leaders and Workfront’s Jada Balster has some suggestions for a smoother agency-brand relationship.

Enjoy the issue. We hope it inspires you to make the change you are longing for.

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WRITER

Worthing

CREATIVE DESIGNER – BRAND

Maidenhead, Berkshire