The Conversation issue: October/November 2019

With two specially designed covers, our latest issue is all about seeing things in a new light. We’ve brought together artists, designers and even figures in politics for a range of conversations on the pressing issues of today

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We are arguably talking more than ever now, whether through social media or acts of protest. While we’re comfortable broadcasting our thoughts, what seems to happen less often is conversation and listening. With this in mind, the latest issue of Creative Review is dedicated to bringing people together for a healthy discussion on some the issues of today.

As activism gains momentum around the world, we bring together designers Lucienne Roberts and Clive Russell (Extinction Rebellion) to discuss the role of the creative industries in bringing about a revolution. Elsewhere, Labour Deputy Leader Tom Watson, Pentagram Partner Naresh Ramchandani and Grace Francis of Droga5 delve into the sticky question of responsibility in the ad world.

Image-makers Tommy Kha and Alexander Coggin peel back the lid on identity, discussing what it means within the frame of their work and beyond. Elsewhere, we jump headfirst into sex and taboos, and three artists also give their two cents on how to get people laughing.

Game of Thrones set designer Deborah Riley and Punchdrunk founder Stephen Dobbie compare their approaches to crafting stories, and we’ve even put our own spin on storytelling by asking two illustrators, Edward Carvalho-Monaghan and Petra Eriksson (who have also kindly created our cover art for this issue) to have a mouth-watering visual conversation on the theme of food.

Plus, as with every issue, we have plenty of other thought-provoking pieces to wrap your head around. Perry Nightingale gets to grips with deepfake software, production designer Mark Friedberg walks us through bringing Gotham to life for Joker, Lego’s Roberto Marchesi discusses how he translates bricks into the digital world, and our oral history series continues with a look back over designing the visual identity for seminal racing game Wipeout.

This issue isn’t about giving you all the answers but instead some food for thought – and hopefully will spark some conversations of your own.

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