The Deptford Takeaway Shop

The Takeaway Shop is a new art project taking place in the last week of January. Curated by artist Amy Lord, it aims to celebrate the history of Deptford in London, as well as introduce visitors to the art of bookbinding…

The Takeaway Shop is a new art project taking place in the last week of January. Curated by artist Amy Lord, it aims to celebrate the history of Deptford in London, as well as introduce visitors to the art of bookbinding…

Lord has gathered together hundreds of historical photos from the area, which has a rich cultural history beginning long before the YBAs landed at Goldsmiths (photo of a live modelling class at Goldsmiths from c. 1900 is shown above). She is encouraging visitors to contribute their own images and stories to the project, and will help them create their own mini-archive from the material in book form, which can then be taken away.

Image showing the aftermath of the great flood of 1928, when barrels of grain and rum filled the streets of Deptford

Deptford air raid control point – the area suffered a German bomb attack in 1943

Lord has gathered together images and ephemera from the area stretching back nearly 200 years, and every picture, of course, tells a broader story. For example, one photo, of G Chapman’s Oil & Colour Store, seems simply a charming example of old-fashioned shop design, but turns out to have also been the scene of a brutal murder, in 1905, of 71 year-old Alf Farrow and his wife. Lord’s aim is to draw out more such stories from locals. “For this piece I wanted to get down to the bare bones of existence – day-to-day life,” she says. “I am fascinated by the 100 year-old photographs of places I walk past every day… It’s important to know the area you live in, what came before you and who lives here now.”

G Chapman’s Oil & Colour Store, 34 Deptford High Street

Shop poster for Trickett’s on Deptford High Street from 1850

The Takeaway Shop will be at Number82, 82 Tanners Hill, Deptford from January 20-27. More information on the project is online here.

 

 

CR in Print

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