The Evolution of Computer Games

A great nostalgia fest and an indication of how much things have changed in the gaming industry, this journey through the evolution of video games shows how the various genres (war games, sports games, etc) have advanced with the available technologies. The clip was produced for a presentation made by game developer David Perry at the TED Conference.

A great nostalgia fest and an indication of how much things have changed in the gaming industry, this journey through the evolution of video games shows how the various genres (war games, sports games, etc) have advanced with the available technologies. The clip was produced for a presentation made by game developer David Perry at the TED Conference.

More from CR

Everything Is A Brand

The irrrepressible Ze Frank on the all pervasive brand – and why Grandma’s Cookies sound so much more enticing than Old People’s Cookies (link: DO)

The Alan Fletcher Show: Some Thoughts

Alan Fletcher as pictured in his final book, Picturing and Poeting, £24.95 / € 39.95, Phaidon 2006
The Design Museum was packed out with the great and good (plus CR) last night for the official opening of Alan Fletcher: Fifty years of graphic work (and play). Given the tragic circumstances, Fletcher having died little more than a month before, the evening was as much celebratory tribute as private view: a chance for the industry to show how much they loved and admired the man. Among those paying homage were Wim Crouwel, Bob Gill and, bizarrely, former quiz show host Bamber Gascoigne (anyone who knows his connection with Fletcher, please enlighten us).
Derek Birdsall gave a touching, if meandering speech and we all left clutching Quentin Newark’s beautiful show guide (the latter features biographical text from the exhibition alongside Peter Wood’s photographs of Fletcher’s gorgeous studio and is almost worth the admission money alone).
Of course the show is great – GTF’s design is respectful and understated while still providing some delightful touches (including a giant 3D Reuters logo) and Emily King cleverly paces the journey through Fletcher’s remarkable career. It’s all there: from the iconoclastic early years, through major corporate work at Pentagram to the exuberance of an independence secured late in life. But as with all great shows, Fletcher’s should be as much about influencing the future as documenting the past. It is the effect that the show will have on those who come to see it that will be as important as the joy of reviewing his triumphs. So here are some thoughts prompted by last night…

Say It Ain’t So

From a 1996 episode of David Letterman’s Late Show: is this where Fallon got the idea for Sony Balls? Please don’t let it be true…

Cashing In?

We hate to say it, but this is pretty bad from the start. But it’s not Johnny Cash’s fault. Featuring 36 famous faces from music and film, the new video accompanying the singer’s track, God’s Gonna Cut You Down, sadly backfires from celebrity overload. Intended as a montage of personal tributes to the Man in Black – which, on its own is a touching idea – the film actually comes across as more of an excercise in cool-by-association.
And rather than a heartfelt eulogy from those indebted to Cash’s music (and many artists featured in the film, of course, had an acknowledged debt to, or intimate friendship with the man) the film feels like a furthering of what’s slowly become, particularly since his death, Brand Cash.

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Graphic Designer

International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis
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Integrated Designer

Centaur Media