The French new wave

The latest installments in Fallon’s quirky French Connection campaign dials up the engaging idiosyncrasies of The Man. And The Woman? Well, she’s still very pretty…

The latest installments in Fallon’s quirky French Connection campaign dials up the engaging idiosyncrasies of The Man. And The Woman? Well, she’s still very pretty…

When this campaign first broke earlier this year, I wrote (here) that “the new campaign feels like an attempt to scrub away the lingering whiff of Bacardi Breezer about the brand and distance it from its punning past.” Trevor Beattie’s FCUK work had cemented his reputation and shifted a lot of gear for his client but, once the joke wore thin, so did customer’s appetite for the brand.

The company doesn’t announce its half-yearly results until next month so it is too early to tell what effect the campaign has had on sales but it may already have shifted perceptions.

The latest tranche of work (which before anyone leaps in and moans that it’s been seen already, has been rolling out over the past couple of weeks) continues the off-beat tone of voice of the originals. Its combination of the high-brow (references to Jørgen Leth’s 1967 short film The Perfect Human) and the plain daft betray the influence of Tomato’s Dirk van Dooren, who worked on the original concept with Fallon’s ECD Richard Flintham.

Once again, Leila and Damien de Blinkk have shot both still and moving image ads with great style.

I like it – it’s original and different and, as one of the commenters pointed out in reference to my original post, injects an element of bizarre humour not seen in fashion promotion since Brian Baderman’s gloriously bizarre Diesel catalogues of the late 90s.

But I have one gripe with it. The Man is engaging, funny and on his way to being a three-dimensional character. The Woman just stands around looking nice, waiting to be admired. Perhaps this reflects research into the differences between men and women when it comes to buying clothes – men generally feeling uncomfortable about the whole thing and needing to make light of it. But it would be nice to think that there is something going on behind that pout.

UPDATE: Apparently, some of the print layouts featured here earlier were not client approved ads. We have replaced them with ads which will run.

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