Tim Biskup brings Space Madness to Hong Kong

Mixing mid-century modern design with a healthy dose of punk rock energy, artist Tim Biskup has gone back to his roots for his latest series of works – creating a collection of bold, cartoon-like paintings. They feature in his latest exhibition, Space Madness, opening in Hong Kong this month

Mixing mid-century modern design with a healthy dose of punk rock energy, artist Tim Biskup has gone back to his roots for his latest series of works – creating a collection of bold, cartoon-like paintings. They feature in his latest exhibition, Space Madness, opening in Hong Kong this month…

Californian Biskup is well-known for creating limited edition prints and objects (once opening a record store and gallery to showcase his music, vinyl figures and books), but in recent year he has concentrated more on painting – and Space Madness represents a return to colourful brushwork.

 

According to Kong Art Space, the work of Roberto Matta has been an influence on Biskup’s output – stylistically there are similarities and, they suggest, there are further links via the use of “Jungian symbolism and surrealist philosophy of automatic composition. Like Matta, Biskup believes that these paintings are biomorphic representations of the artists psyche. What Matta called ‘Inscapes’.”


The title of the exhibition is also a nod to Ren & Stimpy, the classic animated TV show that lured Biskup into the world of cartoon-making in the 1990s where he spent six years in the animation industry before pursuing his career as a fine artist.

Space Madness is at Kong Art Space, G/F, No. 3 Staunton Street, Central Hong Kong from 27 August until 27 September. Seetimbiskup.com. A version of this post was originally published at Inky Goodness

More from CR

Gradwatch: Corin Kennington

We speak to Corin Kennington, who studied graphic and media design at London College of Communication and specialises in typography and hand-painted lettering.

Harvey Nichols: The Provocateurs

The fashion and luxury industries have a reputation for seriousness, but over the last decade and a half luxury department store Harvey Nichols, with its ad agency adam&eveDDB, has shown that its customers will respond to humour too, especially if it comes with an edge. The brand’s marketing work may have received as many complaints as it has awards, but is impossible to ignore – we take an in-depth look at it here.

Steve Frykholm, Herman Miller and the Picnic Posters

In 1970, the Herman Miller Furniture Company hired a Cranbrook School of Art graduate named Steve Frykholm as its first in-house graphic designer – one of his first jobs was to create a poster for the firm’s annual summer picnic. In a new film, Frykholm tells the story of how his series of screenprints developed over 20 years

Artworker

NAO (National Audit Office)

Junior Designer

National Theatre