VW ad aims to catch the fast-forwarders

DDB Brussels has attempted to tackle the growing TV advertising challenge of viewers’ fast-forwarding through ad breaks with its new commercial for Volkswagen. Described by the agency as a new format of advertising, the Volkswagen Beetle ‘Slowmercial’ doubles up as a quasi-print ad when fast-forwarded, and can thus be enjoyed – or at least taken in – at normal speed as well as high speed.

DDB Brussels has attempted to tackle the growing TV advertising challenge of viewers’ fast-forwarding through ad breaks with its new commercial for Volkswagen. Described by the agency as a new format of advertising, the Volkswagen Beetle ‘Slowmercial’ doubles up as a quasi-print ad when fast-forwarded, and can thus be enjoyed – or at least taken in – at normal speed as well as high speed.

As the voiceover explains, “the static TV commercial” (with just a few bird tweets and the slowly opening convertible roof distinguishing it from a print ad) allows that “even with delayed viewing where commercial breaks are likely to be fast forwarded, the Beetle convertible will still be in full view for at least a few seconds”.

An introduction to Volkswagen’s Slowmercial – for the fast-forward version, you can jump to roughly 55 seconds in.

The ad will run during Belgium’s most popular – and frequently recorded – TV shows, such as Homeland and Bones.

Whether the ‘new format’ will catch on is debatable. Similar approaches without the explanatory voice-over declaring the idea behind the ad, and its innovativeness, might be slow to take off – just imagine a slew of supermarkets, betting services, alcoholic beverages and FMCG products rolling through static frames of uneventfulness. But DDB claims that the ad will have 50% more impact than an ordinary commercial through its reach of the delayed viewing public. And more such ads would certainly make for a more zen viewing experience.

Credits
Agency: DDB Brussels
Campaign: Happy Drivers Days: Beetle Cabrio
Creative Director: Peter Ampe
Creative Team: Rom&John, Peter Ampe
Production Company: Compost

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