Walking between two Tates

Since the Tate Modern opened in 2000, London’s South bank has enjoyed a steady torrent of pedestrian traffic, especially at the weekend, as tourists and Londoners alike meander from London Bridge and the delights of Borough Market along the river all the way down to the Tate Britain, taking in several famous bridges and cultural institutions along the way. London-based illustrator Tommy Penton has immersed himself in the route from Tate Britain to Tate Modern, illustrating the view across the Thames every inch of the way and including in the scenes a cornucopia of colourful characters in his vibrant style.
Now his illustrated views have been brought together in a concertina-bound book, Tate to Tate, published by Jonathan Cape and an exhibition at London’s Menier Chocolate Factory…

Westminster Bridge to Hungerford Bridge - by Tommy Penton

Since the Tate Modern opened in 2000, London’s South bank has enjoyed a steady torrent of pedestrian traffic, especially at the weekend, as tourists and Londoners alike meander from London Bridge and the delights of Borough Market along the river all the way down to the Tate Britain, taking in several famous bridges and cultural institutions along the way. London-based illustrator Tommy Penton has immersed himself in the route from Tate Britain to Tate Modern, illustrating the view across the Thames every inch of the way and including in the scenes a cornucopia of colourful characters in his vibrant style.

Now his illustrated views have been brought together in a concertina-bound book, Tate to Tate, published by Jonathan Cape and an exhibition at London’s Menier Chocolate Factory

Handbound edition in slipcase

Penton is currently exhibiting the illustration work from the book, and some new paintings, until 13 September at the Menier Chocolate Factory and is also showcasing a handbound, concertina fold-out edition (shown here) limited to just 250 copies.

Handbound edition, concertina style
Handbound edition folded out

Tommy Penton’s Tate To Tate exhibition runs until 13 September at the Menier Chocolate Factory gallery, 51 Southwark Street, London SE1 1RU

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