Walsall by numbers

A 22 metre-long, hand-painted typographic mural in Walsall town centre combines wayfaring information and facts to tell the story of the West Midlands town in numbers

A 22 metre-long, hand-painted typographic mural in Walsall town centre combines wayfaring information and facts to tell the story of the West Midlands town in numbers

Manchester-based United Creatives worked with Urbed and the regeneration team at Walsall Council on the project which, according to United, covers a “previously dull stretch of concrete” on a shopping centre.

The consultancy says that “The new artwork aims to engender civic pride via a series of positive local facts” (such as Queen Elizabeth the First spending a night there). It also has a functional aspect, providing directions and walking times to local attractions such as Walsall’s arboretum.

 

The artwork was created using laser-cut stencils and micro-porous paint.

 

 

If the artwork is well received, it is hoped that it will be succeeded by a permanent, ceramic mural.

 

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Artworker

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Junior Designer

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