Wear your favourite font on your face with Type glasses

Which font are you? Futura perhaps? Or Times New Roman? Maybe on different days, you feel like different fonts. If so, the Type glasses range will be right up your street…

Which font are you? Futura perhaps? Or Times New Roman? Maybe on different days, you feel like different fonts. If so, the Type glasses range will be right up your street…

Created by Wieden + Kennedy Tokyo in 2014, the Type range has recently been extended to feature the 11 styles shown above, with the newest additions being American Typewriter, Bodoni and Times New Roman, released this week. The range is sold through Japanese online store Oh My Glasses, and for those lucky enough to live in Tokyo, an All-Font Popup Shop is also taking place in the city until September 13, selling the range at the 1LDK Aoyama Hotel.

The frames are all hand-crafted in Sabae, apparently the home of Japanese eyewear craftmanship, and as the illustration below explains, each frame reflects the font that gives it its name.

 

 

Images of the All-font Popup Shop from the Type Instagram feed, @type_gs

 

Unsurprisingly the range only focuses on classic, elegant fonts – there is no space here for Comic Sans yet (though I would personally love to see a CS glasses frame – perhaps Dame Edna would be an inspiration?). But, in photographs at least, the frames look very appealing – sadly they are currently only available in Japan, so I haven’t been able to get my hands on a pair in the flesh. Perhaps we all need to start lobbying W+K Tokyo to begin distributing them overseas?

type.gs

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