What a BA jumbo jet is made up of

From toilet rolls to teaspoons, British Airways loads thousands of individual items on to each jumbo jet before it takes to the skies. Fifty BA employees created an image of a giant plane made up of these items on the floor of an aircraft hangar

From toilet rolls to teaspoons, British Airways loads thousands of individual items on to each jumbo jet before it takes to the skies. Fifty BA employees created an image of a giant plane made up of these items on the floor of an aircraft hangar

According to BA, on a typical jumbo jet, the following items are loaded for each flight:

1,263 items of metal cutlery
1,291 items of china crockery
538 meal trays
735 glasses
650 paper cups
34 metal teapots
220 drinks stirrers
500 coasters
233 toothpicks
2,000 ice cubes
99 full bottles and 326 quarter bottles of wine
700 small cans of fizzy drinks
164 bags of nuts in Club World
337 cushions and pillows
337 sets of headphones
337 headrest covers
435 air sickness bags
58 toilet rolls
40 extension seatbelts for children
340 safety cards
337 copies of High Life magazine
40 skyflyer packs for children
5 first aid kits

All this has to be unloaded at the other end, then reloaded for the next flight, BA say. Which is something to think about next time you are cursing about your delayed plane.

BA employees created an image of a jumbo made up of these items on the floor of a hangar at Heathrow. The process was captured in this time-lapse video

Apparently, the image was first drawn out by two ‘artists’ but neither wish to be named!

In the image, Big Ben is made up of air sickness bags

 

The London Eye is made of a teapot, cutlery, crockery and socks

 

Oven racks also contribute to the London skyline

 

The tailfin is made of headset bags and extension seat belts

 

The Gherkin is made from cushion covers and socks from first class

 

Tea and coffee bags represent the Shard

 

And Tower Bridge is formed from slippers and wash bags

 

All images © Nick Morrish

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