What is the future of type?

“There will always be type, and as long as designers like difference, there will always be unusual typefaces for eccentric applications.” So believes designer and author Steven Heller, but what do you think the future holds for type?

“There will always be type, and as long as designers like difference, there will always be unusual typefaces for eccentric applications.” So believes designer and author Steven Heller, but what do you think the future holds for type?

Designer Sarah Hyndman has been posing the question (via #Futureoftype) in preparation for an event at the St Bride Workshop on May 2. Part of her Type Tasting series, it promises to be “a workshop exploring Victorian display typefaces from the St Bride Library collection whilst discussing the future of type.

“Type samples from the collection will be available as templates so you can recreate the letters by hand,” Hyndman says. “These will range from Grotesque sans serifs of the 19th century to the decorative letters by Louis Jean Pouchée. During the evening you will hand render tweets received about the topic. These will be combined to create the Steampunk style Twitter feed and form the basis for the group discussion.”

As well as Heller, various other design luminaries have shared their view:

“The future of type is the same as football: everyone does it, and even more people have an opinion about it. Only a few make a living out of it, and some of these are very good,” says designer, educator, typographer Petr van Blokland while when Design Week posed the question to Erik Spiekermann, he responded “You might as well ask “What is the future of mankind?”. Why could anybody ask such a general and unspecific question? I’ll still answer it. The future of type is the past of type: visual language. As long as we speak and write, we’ll have type. Different voices, different messages, different media: different type.” Quite.

Details here

 

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