When we were punks…

It’s 1978. A pensive, hirsute Malcolm Garrett (right) sits in on a recording session with Buzzcocks, the Manchester punk band whose image he so deftly crafted out of a resounding collision between day-glo and Constructivism. What’s he thinking about? Lunch? The impending implosion of civil society in the face of Pete Shelley’s checked shirt?
Whatever, he’s probably not thinking “come 2006, this lot are going to need me to design a thirtieth anniversary logo for them”.

Garrett and Shelley

It’s 1978. A pensive, hirsute Malcolm Garrett (right) sits in on a recording session with Buzzcocks, the Manchester punk band whose image he so deftly crafted out of a resounding collision between day-glo and Constructivism. What’s he thinking about? Lunch? The impending implosion of civil society in the face of Pete Shelley’s checked shirt?

Whatever, he’s probably not thinking “come 2006, this lot are going to need me to design a thirtieth anniversary logo for them”.

But here we are, Buzzcocks are on their aforementioned but little imagined tour and Garrett has contributed not just a specially designed logo (shown below) but, drawing on the band’s rich graphic history, stage visuals too.

Buzzcocks 30 logo

Garrett’s retrospective multimedia display, subtitled Remind, the Buzzcocks, features covers and merchandising material from over the past three decades, as well as art and photography from Richard Boon, Kevin Cummins, Chris Gabrin, Linder, Jon Savage, and other memorabilia. Garrett has also designed a thirtieth anniversary logo for the tour: “it’s a witty take on the original and the fact that the music, the band, the logo itself and much of the artwork, have been around for so long,” he says.

Garrett met Buzzcocks along with Richard Boon – founder of New Hormones, the first of the new wave of indie record labels, which released the band’s first EP Spiral Scratch – early in 1977, and designed their logo. ‘‘Working with Richard, Pete Shelley and the rest of the band seemed an inevitability for me at that time,’’ Garrett says. ‘‘We met as part of the nascent punk scene in Manchester – it was impossible to miss each other because at that time there were so few involved.’’

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The first Buzzcocks poster designed by Garrett, from 1977

sheet
Sheet music for single “Love You More’, July 1978

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Carrier bag to accompany first album Another Music in a Different Kitchen, March 1978

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