Wolfgang Tillmans helps HIV fundraiser

Why We Must Provide HIV Treatment Information, the new publication from i-Base (the “treatment literacy” project that focuses on HIV information provision) includes photography by German artist Wolfgang Tillmans. Written by a range of international HIV and AIDS awareness activists and featuring 50 colour photographs by Tillmans, this limited edition book highlights why treatment literacy is essential for empowering HIV-positive people to understand their own treatment.

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Why We Must Provide HIV Treatment Information, the new publication from i-Base (the “treatment literacy” project that focuses on HIV information provision) includes photography by German artist Wolfgang Tillmans. Written by a range of international HIV and AIDS awareness activists and featuring 50 colour photographs by Tillmans, this limited edition book highlights why treatment literacy is essential for empowering HIV-positive people to understand their own treatment.

As the introduction states: “Most people who test HIV-positive go through similar experiences. The shock of diagnosis, isolation, denial, sometimes prejudice. But almost right away there is the need for information: How long will I live? Can I get treatment? Does the treatment work? Are there side effects?” WWMPHTI aims to show how understanding the initial implications of an HIV diagnosis are the first steps on the wider treatment program.

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All the images and graphics in the book are provided copyright free in order that other organisations can use, translate or adapt the the visual and information contained within. In addition to publishing ventures, i-Base also provide training and technical assistance to international HIV community groups. The book can be ordered directly from i-Base and costs £10 plus £2.50 p&p.

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