Guerrilla Gaming

MPU Sydney, Publicis Mojo and Finch have collaborated to create a giant version of the classic mobile game Snake, which can be projected onto walls across cities, allowing gamers to play anywhere in the urban environment…

MPU Sydney, Publicis Mojo and Finch have collaborated to create a giant version of the classic mobile game Snake, which can be projected onto walls across cities, allowing gamers to play anywhere in the urban environment…

What makes the game (titled Snake the Planet!) particularly special is that it generates new level designs for the game depending on where it is projected. In setting up, it scans the façade of the space and any window, door frame, or person that might be standing there turns into a boundary and obstacle in the game. The film below shows it in action:

And this making-of film explains how Snake the Planet! works in more detail:

“We really like that guerrilla element of just cruising around the city and throwing a game of Snake up on any building we like, it makes it immediately accessible for everyone,” says MPU’s Rene Christen.

Snake the Planet! will appear at various events this year: follow MPU on Twitter, @mpulabs, to find out where and when. The team also plan to develop the project further towards an iPad application, and eventually to release the code as open source.

Credits:
Concept and programming: MPU
Film production: Publicis Mojo, Finch
Director: Alexander Roberts
Creative producers: Tim Buesing (Publicis Mojo), Emad Tahtouh (Finch)

 

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