The Occupied Times of London

As the City of London Corporation seeks to evict the Occupy London protesters from the grounds of St Paul’s Cathedral, the movement yesterday launched its own newspaper, which makes good use of Jonathan Barnbrook’s typeface, Bastard

Image taken from virusfonts.com, by Tzortzis Rallis

As the City of London Corporation seeks to evict the Occupy London protesters from the grounds of St Paul’s Cathedral, the movement yesterday launched its own newspaper, which makes good use of Jonathan Barnbrook’s typeface, Bastard…

The Occupied Times of London is designed by Lazaros Kakoulidis and Tzortzis Rallis who used Barnbrook’s VirusFonts typeface, Bastard, for the large intro caps to features and PF Din Mono, designed by Panos Vassiliou of Athens-based foundry Parachute, as the main body copy face.

A nice touch is that individual Bastard caps also crop up within the newspaper’s headlines; perhaps a graphic allusion to the occupiers wedging themselves into the capital’s streets.

“We think [Bastard] is a rather apt choice considering the ideology of the typeface,” write Barnbrook Studio on their Virus blog, “the reinterpretation of blackletter semiotics and insinuation that multinational corporations are akin to the new fascists.”

Of course, no protest is complete without the distribution of banners and signs, so the back page of the first issue is also a handy print-out placard.

And here, the two typefaces work brilliantly together.

Issue one is being distributed outside St Paul’s Cathedral in London but is also available as a PDF, here; or you can view it on issuu.com, here.

 

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